William Saputra: Sociology & Quantitative Methods , University of Edinburgh, Indonesia

“Coming from a sociology background, I often found myself lost in the perplexing field of engineering during my initial days volunteering in WindAid. When I started as a volunteer in the organization, I was worried that I would fall short in contributing to my team’s effort. Lucky for me, the WindAid Institute was anything short of incredible staff members that were not only happy to share their extensive knowledge, but also capable of awakening a sense of curiosity for sustainable engineering in me. What more could you ask for than passion so infectious that you yourself becoming driven in learning more about their field?

With such a dedicated group of people, both staff members and my own group members, I quickly felt comfortable enough to continuously ask questions on a field completely unknown to me. By the end of my project, I had enough confidence to call myself an (makeshift) engineer. However, WindAid was not only an institution that builds on one’s engineering skills but also profoundly affects the local communities of Peru. With the completion of
my group’s project, the community of Nuevo Manzanilla had received a brand new wind turbine that brightened their school and community hall. Furthermore, WindAid did not only provide the local community with a one-off plan for sustainable development but rather provided them with a long-term solution to aiding the village through educating them about the wind turbine itself. Growing popular amongst the communities, WindAid quickly became a gateway for many of the local members to gain opportunities to come to the city and further educate themselves with goals to better their own lives back in their respective villages. In essence, the WindAid Institute leaves a trail of inspiration behind wherever they choose to do a project. I, amongst the many participants, am inspired and thankful I had the chance to work with WindAid.”